Resources

Highlights, useful posts and information about the effects of prison on the incarcerated, their families and their future.

1. See yourself having the job you want.
2. Believe that you will have the job you are interviewing for.
3. Applications alone will not get you the job – follow up and be consistent.
4. The interview is not about you – make it about the employer (ask questions!).
5. At the interview ask the employer: “When can I start?”

There are countless websites to do job searching, which makes it impossible to keep up with them all. I highly recommend that you select a few and remain focused on them. The following websites have given me a lot of success:
www.indeed.com
www.craigslist.org

Merely saying “I need a job” will not get you a job. You need to sell yourself on how you are different than every other candidate that applied for the position. If you’re not telling the employer what value you’re bringing to the table then you’re not selling yourself enough. Think about what you can do for them, besides showing up to work. Tell them you can ensure that you will work diligently and efficiently to make their establishment cleaner, which will bring in more patrons and patrons will stay longer. This adds to the bottom line: as an employer we are looking at the W.I.I.F.M (What’s in it for Me) principle. You need to be clear on your ability to make their life easier.

You qualify as long as you are not working a job on the books. If you are in the halfway house make sure you do not use the halfway house’s address as your residence. They will deny you!

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

Visit PA CareerLink® for free access to many career resources and services. If you are not working a job on the books then you are eligible for up to $5,000 in training money for job and trade training for things such as CDL, Welding, Building Maintenance, Medical Billing, etc. No grants or FAFSA! Check it out! There is a process so just be patient and trust the process.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

A fresh start for people freed from prison

THE RIDE HOME PROGRAM

Every day thousands of people are released from prison with nowhere to go and no one to help them navigate their new life. Our team meets released inmates at the prison gates, guides them through their first hours and days of freedom, and transports them to a pre-approved rehabilitation residence.

The Ride Home Program began as a partnership between the Three Strikes Project at Stanford Law School and the Anti-Recidivism Coalition to provide immediate, intensive, and personalized reentry support to inmates released under reforms to California’s sentencing laws. 

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This New York Times Magazine article follows Carlos and Roby, two ex-convicts with a simple mission: picking up inmates on the day they’re released from prison and guiding them through a changed world. 

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What should those people expect when they get out? The Marshall Project, in partnership with WNYC in New York, asked six men who spent long stretches of their adult lives behind bars to explain what it’s like to re-enter society and what they learned along the way. Some of their advice: take it slow with romance, be honest with your kids, and think about getting a cat.

This article was originally published by The Marshall Project.

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The Marshall Project is a nonpartisan, nonprofit news organization that seeks to create and sustain a sense of national urgency about the U.S. criminal justice system. We achieve this through award-winning journalism, partnerships with other news outlets and public forums. In all of our work we strive to educate and enlarge the audience of people who care about the state of criminal justice.

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Being stripped of parental rights while in prison, even for minor crimes, is “the family separation crisis that no one knows about,” one advocate said.

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